Archives For Church Tech

This one is a long post that really only the tech guys will appreciate. It’s a little bit deeper then my usual posts so beware. Continue Reading…

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Seth Godin says this about art in his book “Linchpin”

Art anything creative passionate and personal
Art is about intent and communication
Uses bravery and insight to challenge the status quo
Personal gift that changes the recipient

This is why Exodus 31 is so important to me and why I want to make it important to other techies and in this case non-techies alike.  It’s about the art we create and how it is a gift to our people but how it is also a gift to God. Your acts of service area gift to God.

What we do is more then button pushing and camera holding, because what we do can change people. It can change people’s thoughts on churches, change peoples opinion of Christians, and can change peoples relationship with their creator.

When you think about what the Auditorium looks like with the bright lights and the huge projector screens and the massive speaker array get that picture in your head, close your eyes and think about what that looks like to you, Now thinks about what that looks like to people to come into our church for the first time.
Now think about what it looks like to God, I think to God it looks like this…. Art with our fingerprints all over it. Roger Blalock pointed this out to me at this session at WFX this past year, If you missed it you should go back and listen to it. He said, this important not because of what it is, but because of the relationship it represents. The most important part of all of this is our relationship with God, don’t miss that in the button mashing.

I say all this to give you perspective, because we need more artists. So keep this vision in mind, I am an artist and I need to identify the others like me.

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So we are kicking of a campaign called #thisisworship and Doug did a great job of opening up the series tonight talking about how worship could really be anything.  I reminded me of a post I did almost a year ago that was probably my favorite blog post this year. So I made a few revisions and I wanted to re-post it.

Work is worship.

This is a great concept that our Marketplace Matters team has trying to get across for a while; work is worship.  This concept really stands out to me personally though, and I wanted to take a few minutes to explain why.
When people talk about worship often they mean singing, those words tend to be synonymous. I want to make the observation that “synonymous” doesn’t mean “mutually exclusive.”  I like to sing and I like to sing to God, but I don’t tend to connect that way.  Mainly because I can’t sing, and because I am SO bad at it I feel like I cheapen my praise. In the old testament; Deuteronomy 12:6 it says “bring your burnt offerings and sacrifices, your tithes and special gifts, what you have vowed to give and your freewill offerings, and the firstborn of your herds and flocks.”

Tithes and special gifts are used in the same sentence.  Sounds to me like it should be something special, something important, first fruits. Singing isn’t special or important to me because I am no good at it. Worse I work with people who are AWESOME at it, so I am constantly reminded of my inability. As a result when I do sing, even in praise, I am not overly demonstrative. I have tried to raise my hands while singing, it always feels wrong.  However, I noticed a few months ago when I am directing IMAG my hands STAY up, I am super demonstrative (just ask my volunteers or look on youtube I know there are videos out there), and in THOSE times are when I most frequently feel like I am connecting with God. I think the fact that I am doing something I think I am good at makes a difference.

The argument could be made “Yeah but I have seen your IMAG and it’s not that good.” That may be but I direct it with pure abandon, I leave it all on the field. I don’t sing that way, ever. Also I think God knows my intent, when I am directing I do it to glorify him.  You could say “Does not the same hold true with singing?” Sure it does, but I didn’t say God had a problem with my singing, I said I did, it creates a barrier for ME.

I also notice the word tithe is use in there in Deuteronomy 12:6 as well. I always heard that explained as giving back to God what has been given to you.  Here is an idea, how about tithing on your talent. God gave it to you, what if you actively found ways to give back 10% of the talent you have been gifted with to God.

I would like to think that since it’s something you are going to be good at you might get more out of dedicating it to God. It might increase your connection to God, or give you another way to connect with Him.

Maybe if you are a computer geek you can volunteer to help the church with IT, or if you are a teacher you could volunteer in a children’s program. Just find a way to utilize the talents you have to glorify God.

I see very clearly for me how work is worship, How about you? Can you find a way to tithe on your talent?

I had a strange train of thought this evening, but it lead to an interesting insight, and I wanted to share it. I have been working at my church for 7 years (give or take…long story). We have 5 services a weekend 4 of which I am responsible for but I cover the 5th service some times as well as all the special stuff; business meetings, prayer and praise nights, singles events, ect…  Now we didn’t always have 5 services when I was hired we only had 2, but we went to 3 pretty quick, and have been a 4 for years now. So lets say it averages out to 4 services every weekend for 7 years.

Our senior Pastor make a point of telling everyone regularly people only come to church on average 2 times a month.  Ok fixing to break out the math so stay with me.  Giving our average attender the benefit of the doubt, lets say they come 3 times a month in 1 year they will attend 36 services (3×12). Keep that number in mind.

In the 7 years I have been at my church I have directed approximately (4x52x7) (#of services x weeks per year x years) = 1,456 services.  Now I know it’s not a competition, cause if it was I would be wining, but how far ahead of the average attender am I? Easy enough to find out, take my total number of services and divide it by the the number the average attender gets in a year and that should tell me how many years of church they need to go to church to catch up to me.  The answer is 40 Years!

Which is funny because I don’t feel like I am carrying around 40 years of theology, I mean I’m not even 40 years old yet. In most schools an  MDiv (Masters of Divinity) is between 72-106 hours. According standard convention it takes 5,000-10,000 hours to master a subject.  So when it comes to directing I sit right in the middle there, WAY more then an masters degree, but not even 1/5 of the way mastering my craft. The good news about that … it means I still have more to learn.

photo credit: Tobyotter via photopin cc

I heard or read something in the past month about “the only real problem with stained glass windows is they face IN instead of OUT.”  It would make more sense to show the world outside the walls of the church the gospel rather then the people inside the church. Continue Reading…

International Sniper Competition
Tech geeks are really a different breed from most of your church staff.  There are lots of reasons for this, a few of which I will go into, but the result is often time you end up with a high capacity asset, who is under utilized. Continue Reading…

Internal Affairs Episode 1 – Introduction from csnow on Vimeo.

This is project I am having my summer interns work on this year, I can’t wait to see where they take it.

 

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If you aren’t a geek or a church tech you need not read beyond this. Continue Reading…

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While on a cruise recently I was talking with a bartender about the most expensive liquor he had in stock. Continue Reading…

HDR Demo

Lately my wife has been telling me I need to get a hobby.  The problem is most hobbies take time and money, neither of which I have enough surplus to spend frivolously. Continue Reading…